The Garage Wall – Part 1 | Design

More detailed plans showing the wall dimensions and hinged attachment points

Part 1 of the Garage Wall Project Build

Before I committed to building an at-home climbing wall, I needed to come up with a design that would meet the following requirements. This was key, because I wanted a wall that I would be motivated to use on a regular basis, but would not interfere with normal day-to-day activities.

Climbing Wall Requirements:

  1. Take up no permanent floor-space
  2. Not interfere with vehicle parking
  3. Stowable design that was still easy to access & deploy
  4. Tall enough to be worthwhile
  5. Multiple or variable angles
  6. Safe & secure
  7. Cost effective

After much measuring in the garage, the brainstorming and sketching began.  My garage has a unique design that has an open loft-like storage area, rather than a sealed off attic. This was going to be perfect for attaching a hinged structure that could flip down, then fold back up into the ceiling when not in use.  The space would allowing for a 10′ tall by nearly 7′ wide climbing surface, and I planned for the default wall angle to be 15°, with stops built in so the wall could also be set at 45° and 50°. The left side of the wall would be 4′ wide, and when set at 50°, would be used for H.I.T. training. The right side of the wall would be 32″ wide, and be used for campusing when set at 15°. The height would allow for 9 campus rungs at “Moon Spacing” (22cm).

Rough sketch of the design and how it will fit into the garage

Rough sketch of the design and how it will fit into the garage

More detailed plans showing the wall dimensions and hinged attachment points

More detailed plans showing the wall dimensions and hinged attachment points

Sketch showing the wall in profile, and the three angle settings

Sketch showing the wall in profile, and the three angle settings

Mocking up the positioning and angle

Mocking up the positioning and angle

Some temporary framing on the left side of the wall. Clamped into place to set the 15 degree angle

Some temporary framing on the left side of the wall. Clamped into place to set the 15 degree angle. The wall will be hinged from this ceiling joist, which has an additional 2×6 sistered to it for supporting the additional load and connections.

Mocking up the positioning of the wall, and determining where it will hit the floor when at the 15 degree angle.

Mocking up the positioning of the wall, and determining where it will hit the floor when at the 15 degree angle.

Continue to Part 2 of the Garage Wall Build

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